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2008 IACC Autism Spectrum Disorder Research Portfolio Analysis Report

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Introduction

In 2009, the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) conducted a comprehensive analysis of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research portfolios of major Federal agencies and private organizations. The analysis was conducted to better inform the committee and interested public about the funding landscape for ASD research and how well this matched the new IACC Strategic Plan for ASD research. In so doing, the portfolio analysis also can be used by Federal agencies and private research organizations to help guide future funding priorities by highlighting current gaps and opportunities in ASD research as well as serving as a baseline to assess research progress.

Who funded ASD research in 2008?

The Office of Autism Research Coordination (OARC), on behalf of the IACC, asked Federal agencies and private organizations for information about the ASD-related research grants that they supported in 2008, including the annual budget of each project and its relevance to the six questions of the 2009 IACC Strategic Plan for ASD Research (e.g., When Should I Be Concerned? How Can I Understand What Is Happening? What Caused This To Happen and Can It Be Prevented? Which Treatments and Interventions Will Help? Where Can I Turn For Services? What Does the Future Hold?). Nineteen ASD stakeholders were approached for funding information (Figure 1). Of those, 13 reported that they had funded ASD research in 2008. The remaining six were funding service programs or other non-research activities, rather than ASD research Table 1 lists the 19 Federal agencies and private organizations approached for the portfolio analysis and notes whether or not each stakeholder funded ASD research in 2008.

Organizations Included in the 2008 IACC Portfolio Analysis of ASD Research Funding

Federal Agencies Private Organizations
  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF)*
  • Agency for Healthcare and Research Quality (AHRQ)*
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)
  • Department of Defense (DoD)
  • Department of Education (ED)
  • Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)*
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Social Security Administration (SSA)*
  • Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)*
  • Autism Consortium
  • Autism Speaks
  • Autism Research Institute (ARI)
  • Center for Autism and Related Disabilities
  • The Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism*
  • Organization for Autism Research (OAR)
  • Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center (SARRC)
  • Simons Foundation (Simons)

* Indicates organizations that reported that they had not funded ASD research in 2008.

Table 1. The table lists the nineteen Federal agencies and private organizations included in the 2008 analysis of ASD research funding and indicates whether the organization funded ASD research during the year. Six of the eleven Federal agencies that were approached for the portfolio analysis reported funding ASD research, as did seven of the eight private organizations.

What was the basic breakdown of funding?

The 13 stakeholders that funded ASD research in 2008 contributed a total of $222,215,342 across 745 projects (Table 2). The average funding per project varied greatly between organizations, ranging from $24,643 to $2,030,264, with some organizations choosing to support a few large projects while others distributed funds across several smaller projects. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) contributed the largest amount of research funding in 2008, spending $117,969,770 on 340 projects, followed by the Simons Foundation with 77 projects totaling $42,985,684. Autism Speaks ranked third with $30,828,116 spent across 200 projects. In the split between Federal and private funding, the Federal government supported about two-thirds of the total research budget, while private organizations funded the remaining one-third (Figure 1).

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2008 ASD Research Funding by Funding Agency/Organization

Funding Agency/Organization* Number of Projects Average Funding Per Project Total Funding
National Institutes of Health 340 $346,970 $117,969,770
Simons Foundation 77 $558,256 $42,985,684
Autism Speaks 200 $154,141 $30,828,116
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 27 $682,855 $15,022,812
Health Resources and Services Administration 3 $2,030,264 $6,090,792
Department of Education 7 $491,292 $3,439,047
Autism Consortium 22 $100,683 $2,215,017
Department of Defense 8 $147,223 $1,177,781
Center for Autism and Related Disorders 26 $31,369 $815,581
Organization for Autism Research 16 $45,625 $730,000
Autism Research Institute 13 $40,085 $521,099
Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center 5 $79,000 $395,000
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 1 $24,643 $24,643
Grand Total 745 $300,291 $222,215,342

*Research projects included are those identified by the agencies and organizations as funded in the most recent 12 months for which data were available. The NIH project number shown reflects unique NIH projects. Projects funded by more than one NIH institute ("co-funds") were combined and only counted as a single project. This approach differs from that used in the NIH RePORTER system, where each co-fund is counted as a separate project.

Table 2. The table lists the total funding provided by the agencies and organizations included in the portfolio analysis, the number of projects funded, and the average funding per project. Together, the agencies and organizations funded 745 projects at an average of $300,291 per project.

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Comparison of Federal versus Private Funding for ASD Research in 2008

Figure 1: Chart of the total 2008 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) research funding by type of agency or organization is $222,215,342:  the Federal research funding is $143,724,845, or 65%, versus the private investment, which is $78,490,497 or 35%.

Figure 1. Sixty-five percent of the $222 million spent on ASD research in 2008 came from Federal sources, while thirty-five percent of funding came from private organizations.

What ASD research was done?

To better understand what areas of research were funded in 2008, projects were mapped to the corresponding questions in the 2009 Strategic Plan. Figure 2 illustrates the breakdown of the research funding according to the Plan's six questions related to diagnosis, biology, risk and protective factors, treatments, services, and lifespan issues. Identifying how current research investments correspond to the Plan will help to understand the current main areas of focus in the field, as well as areas that are currently underdeveloped. In 2008, the largest proportion of research funding (37%) related to the question of ASD causation: "What Caused This to Happen and Can It Be Prevented?" Research on treatments and interventions received the next largest investment with 24% of total funding. Understanding the underlying biology of ASD received 18% of funding and research addressing diagnosis received 13%. The two areas of the Plan that received the least amount of funding related to services research (1%) and research on lifespan issues ("What Does the Future Hold"), which includes transitioning into adulthood (5%).

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2008 ASD Research Funding by Topic Area (Defined as Questions in the 2009 Strategic Plan)
(Total ASD funding = $222,215,342)

Figure 2: Pie chart of the total 2008 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) research funding by strategic plan question is $222,215,342: Question 1: When should I be concerned? $29,123,209, 13%, Question 2: How can I understand what is happening? $40,621,403, 18%, Question 3: What caused this to happen and can this be prevented? $82,846,620, 37% Question 4: Which treatments and interventions will help? $53,968,973, 24%, Question 5: Where can I turn for services? $1,685,222, 1%, Question 6: What does the future hold? $9,796,491, 5%.  Not reflected in strategic plan $4,173,424, 2%.

Figure 2. In 2008, the largest proportion of research funding (thirty-seven percent) was devoted to risk factors for ASD reflected in the question: "What Caused This to Happen and Can It Be Prevented?" Twenty-four percent of the research addressed interventions and treatments, eighteen percent related to the underlying biology of ASD, and thirteen percent related to diagnosis. Research on services and lifespan issues received the smallest proportion of funding.

How did the research align with the objectives in the IACC Strategic Plan?

After assessing the distribution of research funding across the Strategic Plan questions, the IACC analyzed how well the 2008 research addressed the specific goals outlined in the Plan's 40 research objectives. Each question in the Plan has several long and short-term objectives calling for specific research projects with a goal date and an estimate of the budget required to accomplish the goal. For example, the first objective in Question 1: "When Should I Be Concerned?" calls for the development of "at least one efficient diagnostic instrument that is valid in diverse populations for use in large-scale studies by 2011," with a recommended budget of $5,300,000 over two years.

Figure 3 illustrates how much of the 2008 funding addresses specific objectives in the Plan. Each Plan question is represented by a bar; the blue portion illustrates the amount of funding within the question that went towards research aligned with one of the objectives. The red portion represents research that relates to the topic area of the question (e.g., diagnosis, biology, risk factors, etc.), but is not specific to any of the objectives. As an example, a research project studying how children with ASD process the visual information that accompanies speech has implications for diagnosis, however it does not relate to a specific objective in Question 1. This would be classified as Question 1 research "not specific to objectives."

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2008 ASD Research Funding by Strategic Plan Question: Specific versus Not Specific to Research Objectives

Figure 3: Bar graph of 2008 Autism Spectrum Disorder Research Funding by Strategic Plan Question: Specific versus Not Specific to Research Objectives: Question 1: When should I be concerned? Specific to Objectives $10,893,224, Not Specific to Objectives $18,229,985, Question 2: How can I understand what is happening? Specific to Objectives $16,919,953, Not Specific to Objectives $23,701,450, Question 3: What caused this to happen and can this be prevented? Specific to Objectives $76,055,612 Not Specific to Objectives $6,791,008, Question 4: Which treatments and interventions will help? Specific to Objectives $36,893,068 Not Specific to Objectives $14,075,905, Question 5: Where can I turn for services? Specific to Objectives $437,508, Not Specific to Objectives $1,247,714, Question 6: What does the future hold? Specific to Objectives $9,328,808, Not Specific to Objectives $467,683, Not reflected in the strategic plan $4,173,424.

Figure 3. The bar chart shows the amount of ASD funding that aligned with objectives in the Strategic Plan. The blue sections represent research that fulfilled Plan objectives, while the red sections represent research within the question topic area that fell outside the specific projects called for in the objectives. Research related to Questions 3 and 6 – risk factors and lifespan issues – had the highest proportion of projects that aligned with objectives.

Of the six questions, Question 4 – which relates to issues over the lifespan – had the largest proportion of research aligned with an objective (95% of the total $9.8 million in funding). This was followed by Question 3 on risk factors, with 92% of the $82.8 million in research corresponding to an objective. Conversely, more than half of the funding devoted to Question 1: "When Should I Be Concerned?" and Question 2: "How Can I Understand What is Happening?" was for projects outside the focus of the objectives.

When examining only Federal funding, the distribution of objective-specific research is strikingly similar to that of the combined Federal and private funding (Figure 4). The vast majority of research related to Questions 3 and 6 is specific to Plan objectives, while Questions 1 and 2 show the opposite pattern.

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2008 Federal Funding of ASD Research by Strategic Plan Question: Specific versus Not Specific to Research Objectives

Figure 4: Bar graph of 2008 Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) research federal funding by strategic plan question:  specific versus not specific to research objectives: Question 1: When should I be concerned? Specific to Objectives $7,506,667, Not Specific to Objectives $16,476,742, Question 2: How can I understand what is happening? Specific to Objectives $7,027,130, Not Specific to Objectives $19,262,818, Question 3: What caused this to happen and can this be prevented? Specific to Objectives $47,252,255 Not Specific to Objectives $4,637,228, Question 4: Which treatments and interventions will help? Specific to Objectives $21,392,360 Not Specific to Objectives $13,233,181, Question 5: Where can I turn for services? Specific to Objectives $24,643, Not Specific to Objectives $1,247,714, Question 6: What does the future hold? Specific to Objectives $2,471,000, Not Specific to Objectives $467,683, Not reflected in the strategic plan $4,535,674.

Figure 4. Federal funding of ASD research in 2008 showed a similar pattern to overall funding – research related to risk factors and lifespan issues most closely aligned with the Plan objectives, while more than half of the research related to diagnosis and biology did not align with stated objectives.

Conclusion

The 2008 ASD research funding portfolio analysis is the first comprehensive review of ASD research funding across both the public and private sector and provides a valuable snapshot of the current funding landscape. This initial analysis will serve as the baseline for future analyses of ASD research funding to be conducted annually as part of the updating process for the IACC Strategic Plan for Autism Spectrum Disorder Research. Trends identified during the analysis can be used to address underfunded areas, identify new research opportunities and priorities, and guide the direction of future research.

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Appendix A: ASD Research Progress on 2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives


Data includes 2008 funding from Federal/private funders of ASD research.
Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding.Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount.Red dot: Objective has no funding. Current project and funding status for each question or objective is indicated within the table by colored "dots" next to the objective. Any objective colored green has greater than or equal to the recommended funding; any objective colored yellow has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount; while any objective colored red has no funding.

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 1: When should I be concerned?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
1.1 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Develop, with existing tools, at least one efficient diagnostic instrument (e.g., briefer, less time intensive) that is valid in diverse populations for use in large-scale studies by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $5,300,000 over 2 years. 2
(2%)
$75,000
(<1%)
<1%
1.2 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Validate and improve the sensitivity and specificity of new or existing screening tools for detecting ASD through studies of the following community populations that are diverse in terms of age, socio-economic status, race, ethnicity and level of functioning by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $5,400,000 over 3 years.
  • School aged children
  • General population (vs. clinical population)
8
(7%)
$1,246,922 (4%) <1%
1.3 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Identify a panel of biomarkers that separately, or in combination with behavioral measures, accurately identify, before age 2, one or more subtypes of children at risk for developing ASD by 2014. IACC Recommended Budget: $33,300,000 over 5 years. 14
(13%)
$2,885,940
(10%)
1%
1.4 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Develop at least five measures of behavioral and/or biological heterogeneity in children or adults with ASD, beyond variation in intellectual disability, that clearly relate to etiology and risk, treatment response and/or outcome by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $71,100,000 over 5 years. 18
(17%)
$5,773,203
(20%)
3%
1.5 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Identify and develop measures to assess at least three continuous dimensions of ASD symptoms and severity that can be used by practitioners and/or parents to assess response to intervention for people with ASD across the lifespan by 2016. IACC Recommended Budget: $18,500,000 over 5 years. 2
(2%)
$912,159
(3%)
<1%
1.Other Not specific to any objective 63
(59%)
$18,229,985
(63%)
8%
Total Funding for Question 1 107
(100%)
$29,123,209
(100%)
13%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 2: How can I understand what is happening?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
2.1 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Establish an international network of biobanks for the collection of brain and other tissue (e.g., skin fibroblasts) with acquisition sites that use standardized protocols for phenotyping, collection and distribution of tissue by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $10,500,000 over 2 years. 1
(<1%)
$4,318,579
(11%)
2%
2.2 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Support at least four research projects to identify mechanisms of metabolic and/or immune system interactions with the central nervous system that may underlie the development of ASD during prenatal-postnatal life by 2010. IACC Recommended Budget: $9,800,000 over 4 years. 18
(9%)
$3,377,568
(8%)
2%
2.3 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Launch three studies that specifically focus on the neurodevelopment of females with ASD by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $8,900,000 over 5 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
2.4 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Identify ways to increase awareness among the autism spectrum community of the potential value of brain and tissue donation to further basic research. IACC Recommended Budget: $1,400,000 over 2 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
2.5 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Complete a large-scale, multi-disciplinary, collaborative project that longitudinally and comprehensively examines how the biological, clinical, and developmental profiles of children, with a special emphasis on females, youths, and adults with ASD change over time as compared to typically developing people by 2020. IACC Recommended Budget: $126,200,000 over 12 years. 49
(24%)
$8,523,806
(21%)
3%
2.6 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Maintain an international network of biobanks and support continued collection of brain and other tissue. IACC Recommended Budget: $22,200,000 over 5 years. 1
(<1%)
$700,000
(2%)
<1%
2.Other Not specific to any objective 133
(66%)
$23,701,450
(58%)
11%
Total Funding for Question 2 202
(100%)
$40,621,403
(100%)
18%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 3: What caused this to happen and can it be prevented?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
3.1 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Initiate studies on at least five environmental factors identified in the recommendations from the 2007 IOM report "Autism and the Environment: Challenges and Opportunities for Research" as potential causes of ASD by 2010. IACC Recommended Budget: $23,600,000 over 2 years. 19
(9%)
$7,600,673
(9%)
3%
3.2 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Coordinate and implement the inclusion of approximately 20,000 subjects for genome-wide association studies, as well as a sample of 1,200 for sequencing studies to examine more than 50 candidate genes by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $43,700,000 over 4 years. 14
(6%)
$4,065,392
(5%)
2%
3.3 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Within the highest priority categories of exposures for ASD, identify and standardize at least three measures for identifying markers of environmental exposure in biospecimens by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $3,500,000 over 3 years. 4
(2%)
$713,227
(1%)
<1%
3.4 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Initiate efforts to expand existing large case-control and other studies to enhance capabilities for targeted gene – environment research by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $27,800,000 over 5 years. 4
(2%)
$4,703,867
(6%)
2%
3.5 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Enhance existing case-control studies to enroll broad ethnically diverse populations affected by ASD by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $3,300,000 over 5 years. 2
(1%)
$84,628
(<1%)
<1%
3.6 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Determine the effect of at least five environmental factors on the risk for subtypes of ASD in the pre- and early postnatal period of development by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $25,100,000 over 7 years. 13
(6%)
$1,803,628
(2%)
1%
3.7 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Conduct a multi-site study of the subsequent pregnancies of 1,000 women with a child with ASD to assess the impact of environmental factors in a period most relevant to the progression of ASD by 2014. IACC Recommended Budget: $11,100,000 over 5 years. 1
(<1%)
$2,742,999
(3%)
1%
3.8 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Identify genetic risk factors in at least 50% of people with ASD by 2014. IACC Recommended Budget: $33,900,000 over 6 years. 83
(38%)
$37,043,410
(45%)
17%
3.9 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Support ancillary studies within one or more large-scale, population-based surveillance and epidemiological studies, including U.S. populations, to collect nested, case-control data on environmental factors during preconception, and during prenatal and early postnatal development, as well as genetic data, that could be pooled (as needed), to analyze targets for potential gene/environment interactions by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $44,400,000 over 5 years. 29
(13%)
$17,297,788
(21%)
8%
3.Other Not specific to any objective 52
(24%)
$6,791,008
(8%)
3%
Total Funding for Question 3 221
(100%)
$82,846,620
(100%)
37%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 4: Which treatments and interventions will help?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
4.1 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Launch at least four research projects that seek to identify biological signatures that measure significant changes in ASD core symptoms across the lifespan by 2010. IACC Recommended Budget: $12,700,000 over 4 years. 5
(3%)
$1,047,768
(2%)
<1%
4.2 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Support at least three randomized controlled trials that address co-occurring medical conditions associated with ASD by 2010. IACC Recommended Budget: $13,400,000 over 3 years. 5
(3%)
$4,583,171
(9%)
2%
4.3 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Conduct five randomized controlled trials of early intervention for infants and toddlers by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $16,700,000 over 5 years. 16
(9%)
$8,071,787
(15%)
4%
4.4 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Launch three randomized controlled trials of interventions for school-aged and/or adolescents by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $15,600,000 over 5 years. 30
(17%)
$4,037,729
(7%)
2%
4.5 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Standardize and validate at least 20 model systems (e.g. cellular and/or animal) that replicate features of ASD and will allow identification of specific molecular targets or neural circuits amenable to existing or new interventions by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $75,000,000 over 5 years. 42
(24%)
$15,879,827
(30%)
7%
4.6 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Test safety and efficacy of at least five widely used interventions (e.g., nutrition, medications, medical procedures) that have not been rigorously studied for use in ASD by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $27,800,000 over 5 years. 8
(5%)
$641,285
(1%)
<1%
4.7 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Complete two multi-site randomized controlled trials of comprehensive early intervention that address core symptoms, family functioning and community involvement by 2013. IACC Recommended Budget: $16,700,000 over 5 years. 5
(3%)
$4,236,869
(8%)
2%
4.8 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Complete at least three randomized controlled trials on medications targeting core symptoms in people with ASD of all ages by 2014. IACC Recommended Budget: $22,200,000 over 5 years. 12
(7%)
$1,380,376
(3%)
<1%
4.9 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Develop interventions for siblings of people with ASD with the goal of reducing risk recurrence by at least 30% by 2014. IACC Recommended Budget: $6,700,000 over 5 years. 1
(<1%)
$14,256
(<1%)
<1%
4.Other Not specific to any objective 54
(30%)
$14,075,905
(26%)
6%
Total Funding for Question 4 178
(100%)
$53,968,973
(100%)
24%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 5: Where can I turn for services?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
5.1 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Initiate a "State of the States" assessment of existing state programs and supports for people and families living with ASD by 2009. IACC Recommended Budget: $630,000 over 2 years. 6
(40%)
$311,670
(18%)
<1%
5.2 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Support two studies that assess how variations and access to services affect family functioning in diverse populations by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $1,000,000 over 3 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
5.3 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of at least four evidence-based services for people with ASD of all ages in community settings by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $16,700,000 over 5 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
5.4 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Test four methods to improve dissemination of effective interventions in diverse community settings by 2013. IACC Recommended Budget: $7,000,000 over 5 years 2
(15%)
$125,838
(7%)
<1%
5.Other Not specific to any objective 5
(38%)
$1,247,714
(74%)
<1%
Total Funding for Question 5 13
(100%)
$1,685,222
(100%)
1%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Question 6: What does the future hold, particularly for adults?

2009 IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
6.1 Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding. Develop and have available to the research community means by which to merge or link databases that allow for tracking the involvement of people in ASD research by 2010. IACC Recommended Budget: $1,300,000 over 2 years. 4
(44%)
$6,767,808
(69%)
3%
6.2 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Launch at least two studies to assess and characterize variation in adults living with ASD (e.g., social and daily functioning, demographic, medical and legal status) by 2011. IACC Recommended Budget: $5,000,000 over 3 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
6.3 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Conduct at least two clinical trials to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of interventions, services and supports to optimize daily functioning (e.g., educational, vocational, recreational, and social experiences) for adolescents, adults, or seniors living with ASD by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $8,000,000 over 5 years. 2
(22%)
$90,000
(1%)
<1%
6.4 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Conduct a needs assessment to determine how to merge or link administrative and/or surveillance databases that allow for tracking the involvement of people living with ASD in health care, education, and social services by 2009. IACC Recommended Budget: $520,000 over 1 year. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
6.5 Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount. Develop at least two community-based interventions with individual specificity that improves outcomes, as measured by educational, occupational, and social achievements by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $12,900,000 over 5 years. 1
(11%)
$2,471,000
(25%)
1%
6.6 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Develop and have available to the research community means by which to merge or link administrative databases that allow for tracking the involvement of people living with ASD research in health care, education, and social services by 2018. IACC Recommended Budget and Time Frame: To Be Determined. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
6.7 Red dot: Objective has no funding. Conduct a cost/benefit analysis on provision of services and interventions over the lifespan with regard to long-term benefits including employment, productivity, and the need for federal/state assistance. IACC Recommended Budget: $2,300,000 over 3 years. $0
(0%)
$0
(0%)
0%
6.Other Not specific to any objective 2
(22%)
$467,683
(5%)
<1%
Total Funding for Question 6 9
(100%)
$9,796,491
(100%)
5%

The percentages noted in parentheses in the "Projects" and "Funding" columns indicate the fraction of all projects or funding within that specific question, whereas the percentage in the "Percent of Total ASD Funding" column indicates the percent of the entire ASD research funding portfolio for 2008.

Not specific to Strategic Plan Questions

IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
Other 14
(100%)
$4,173,424
(100%)
2%

Grand Total

IACC Strategic Plan Objectives Projects Funding % of Total Funding
Total ASD Funding for 2008 744 $222,215,342 100%
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