Strategic Plan Objective Detail
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Question 6: Long-term Objective B  

$718,290.00
Fiscal Year: 2009

New! Yellow dot: Objective has some degree of funding, but less than the recommended amount.6LB. Conduct one study that builds on carefully characterized cohorts of children and youth with ASD to determine how interventions, services, and supports delivered during childhood impact adult health and quality of life outcomes by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $5,000,000 over 5 years.

Download 2009 Question 6: Long-term Objective B projects (EXCEL)
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Project Title Principal Investigator Institution
Longitudinal studies of autism spectrum disorders: 2 to 23 Lord, Catherine University of Michigan
Service transitions among youth with autism spectrum disorders Shattuck, Paul Washington University in St. Louis

Objective Cumulative Funding Table

IACC Strategic Plan Objective 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total
Conduct one study that builds on carefully characterized cohorts of children and youth with ASD to determine how interventions, services, and supports delivered during childhood impact adult health and quality of life outcomes by 2015.

IACC Recommended Budget: $5,000,000 over 5 years
N/A

6.L.B
$718,290
2 projects

6.L.B
$1,280,790
3 projects

6.L.B
$1,348,557
4 projects

6.L.B
$639,346
2 projects

$3,986,983
6.L.B. Funding: The recommended budget was partially met.

Progress: More than the minimum of one recommended project was funded. However, the projects have not answered all of the questions regarding long-term outcomes of interventions, services and supports received during childhood and more research is needed in this area.

Remaining gaps, needs and opportunities: More than one study would be useful for this objective, including a focus on the benefits of early intervention. The barrier of the high cost of conducting these types of studies could be mitigated by capitalizing on partnerships between groups and on existing infrastructure.