Strategic Plan Objective Detail
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Question 4: Short-term Objective B  

$20,162,709.18
Fiscal Year: 2009

Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding.4SB. Standardize and validate at least 20 model systems (e.g., cellular and/or animal) that replicate features of ASD and will allow identification of specific molecular targets or neural circuits amenable to existing or new interventions by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $75,000,000 over 5 years.

Download 2009 Question 4: Short-term Objective B projects (EXCEL)
Note: Initial Sort is by Principal Investigator. Sorting by other columns is available by clicking on the desired column header.
Project Title Principal Investigator Institution
Modeling and pharmacologic treatment of autism spectrum disorders in Drosophila McDonald, Thomas Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
Neurobiological mechanism of 15q11-13 duplication autism spectrum disorder Anderson, Matthew Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Probing disrupted cortico-thalamic interactions in autism spectrum disorders Fagiolini, Michela Children's Hospital Boston
Analysis of cortical circuits related to ASD gene candidates Zador, Anthony Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Novel models to define the genetic basis of autism Mills, Alea Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Systematic analysis of neural circuitry in mouse models of autism Osten, Pavel Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Molecular determinants of L-type calcium channel gating Colecraft, Henry Columbia University
Genomic imbalances at the 22q11 locus and predisposition to autism Gogos, Joseph Columbia University
Neurexin-neuroligin trans-synaptic interaction in learning and memory Kandel, Eric Columbia University
Neurogenetic model of social behavior heterogeneity in autism spectrum disorders Platt, Michael Duke University
Role of UBE3A in neocortical plasticity and function Ehlers, Michael Duke University
Neural mechanisms of social cognition and bonding Young, Larry Emory University
Genomic resources for identifying genes regulating social behavior Young, Larry Emory University
Central vasopressin receptors and affiliation Young, Larry Emory University
Characterization of the transcriptome in an emerging model for social behavior Thomas, James Emory University
Development of genomic resources for prairie voles Young, Larry Emory University
Vasopressin receptors and social attachment Young, Larry Emory University
Behavioral and neural processing of faces and expressions in nonhuman primates Parr, Lisa Emory University
Behavioral, physiological & neuroanatomical consequences of maternal separation Parr, Lisa Emory University
Central vasopressin receptors and affiliation Young, Larry Emory University
Perturbed activity-dependent plasticity mechanisms in autism Sabatini, Bernardo Harvard Medical School
Dynamic regulation of Shank3 and ASD Worley, Paul Johns Hopkins University
The role of SHANK3 in the etiology of autism spectrum disorder Bangash, M. Johns Hopkins University
The role of CNTNAP2 in embryonic neural stem cell regulation Gaiano, Nicholas Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Investigation of the role of MET kinase in autism Dawson, Ted Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Objective Cumulative Funding Table

IACC Strategic Plan Objective 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total
Standardize and validate at least 20 model systems (e.g., cellular and/or animal) that replicate features of ASD and will allow identification of specific molecular targets or neural circuits amenable to existing or new interventions by 2012.

IACC Recommended Budget: $75,000,000 over 5 years
4.5
$15,879,827
42 projects

4.S.B
$20,162,709
70 projects

4.S.B
$23,229,501
92 projects

4.S.B
$21,606,118
89 projects

4.S.B
$21,232,514
94 projects

$102,110,669
4.S.B. Funding: The recommended budget was met. Significantly more than the recommended minimum budget was allocated to projects specific to this objective.

Progress: More than 90 projects were supported to develop animal models.

Remaining Gaps, Needs, and Opportunities: Planning Group members discussed whether the amount of investment in this area is appropriate when compared to investments in clinical trials and other later stage studies. Invited experts suggested that the current stage of scientific research in ASD requires pre-clinical research to identify targets from animal and cellular models. Similar to cancer treatment development pathways, which spanned 20-30 years, research in ASD must invest in model systems to understand the fundamental biology from which translation to the clinic can be built. The translational validity of research in non-human animals cannot be determined until human trials are conducted, thus the need for rapid progress to clinical studies in humans is important.