Strategic Plan Objective Detail
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Question 4: Objective 5  

$15,879,826.98
Fiscal Year: 2008

Green dot: Objective has greater than or equal to the recommended funding.4.5 Standardize and validate at least 20 model systems (e.g. cellular and/or animal) that replicate features of ASD and will allow identification of specific molecular targets or neural circuits amenable to existing or new interventions by 2012. IACC Recommended Budget: $75,000,000 over 5 years.

Download 2008 Question 4: Objective 5 projects (EXCEL)
Note: Initial Sort is by Principal Investigator. Sorting by other columns is available by clicking on the desired column header.
Project Title Principal Investigator Institution
Generation of genetic models of autism in mice Fishell, Gordon New York University School of Medicine
Testing the effects of cortical disconnection in non-human primates Krauzlis, Richard Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Role of L-type calcium channels in hippocampal neuronal network activity Owen, Scott Stanford University
Function and dysfunction of neuroligins Sudhof, Thomas Stanford University
Probing a monogenic form of autism from molecules to behavior Tsien, Richard Stanford University
Exploring the role of synaptic proteins in mouse models of autism Heintz, Nathaniel The Rockefeller University
A better understanding of the therapeutic actions of specific neuroleptics in autism Greengard, Paul The Rockefeller University
Analysis of 15q11-13 GABA-A receptor defects in autism Hogart, Amber University of California, Davis
Neocortical regionalization: Analysis of genetic and epigenetic influences Huffman, Kelly University of California, Riverside
Analysis of FGF17 roles and regulation in mammalian forebrain development Hoch, Renee University of California, San Francisco
Role of Wnt signaling through Dishevelled, Dact and p120catenin in forebrain development, synaptic physiology, and mouse behavior: Exploration of a pathway with many components linked to autism spectrum disorders Reichardt, Louis University of California, San Francisco
A mouse knock-in model for Engrailed 2 autism susceptibility Millonig, James University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Dysregulation of p13/AKT in mouse models for social interaction deficits and for ASD with macrocephaly Parada, Luis University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Steroid receptors and brain sex differences Auger, Anthony University of Wisconsin - Madison
Regulation of MET expression in autism disorder and forebrain ontogeny Bergman, Mica Vanderbilt University
Neurodevelopmental mechanisms of social behavior Levitt, Pat Vanderbilt University
Using zebrafish and chemical screening to define function of autism genes Sive, Hazel Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Objective Cumulative Funding Table

IACC Strategic Plan Objectives 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total
Standardize and validate at least 20 model systems (e.g., cellular and/or animal) that replicate features of ASD and will allow identification of specific molecular targets or neural circuits amenable to existing or new interventions by 2012.

IACC Recommended Budget: $75,000,000 over 5 years
4.5
$15,879,827
42 projects

4.S.B
$20,162,709
70 projects

4.S.B
$23,229,501
92 projects

4.S.B
$21,606,118
89 projects

4.S.B
$21,232,514
94 projects

$102,110,669
4.S.B. Funding: The recommended budget was met. Significantly more than the recommended minimum budget was allocated to projects specific to this objective.

Progress: More than 90 projects were supported to develop animal models.

Remaining Gaps, Needs, and Opportunities: Planning Group members discussed whether the amount of investment in this area is appropriate when compared to investments in clinical trials and other later stage studies. Invited experts suggested that the current stage of scientific research in ASD requires pre-clinical research to identify targets from animal and cellular models. Similar to cancer treatment development pathways, which spanned 20-30 years, research in ASD must invest in model systems to understand the fundamental biology from which translation to the clinic can be built.  The translational validity of research in non-human animals cannot be determined until human trials are conducted, thus the need for rapid progress to clinical studies in humans is important.