Project Detail
Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) logo
Office of Autism Research Coordination (OARC) logo

Survey on treatment for children with autism with and without seizures  

Seizures and epilepsy are common medical disorders that affect children with autism spectrum disorder. Individuals with ASD have a 3 to 22-fold increase in the risk of developing epilepsy as compared to the typical population. The relationship between epilepsy, seizures and ASD is complex, and there is a dearth of information regarding the treatment of individuals with ASD and seizures. This research will fund the implementation and analysis of a parent-friendly online survey for parents of children with ASD, both with and without seizures. The survey is comprehensive and includes questions on seizure characteristics, co-occurring medical conditions, changes in seizures that occur with seasons and allergy flares, and most importantly; the efficacy, effects on behavior and cognition, and side effects of traditional and non-traditional treatments. Local and national autism support groups will be contacted to ask them to advertise the survey and to assist with organization and analysis of the collected data. Responses will be broken down into subgroups in order to study the relationship between ASD and seizures in detail. Project Status
NEW

2010

Funder Autism Research Institute
Fiscal Year Funding $7,500.00
Current Award Period 2010-2011
Project Number 2010-7
Principal Investigator Frye, Richard
Received ARRA Funding? No
Strategic Plan Question Question 4: Which Treatments And Interventions Will Help? (Treatments)
Subcategory Medical/Pharmacologic
Strategic Plan Objective 4O. Not specific to Question 4 objectives
Federal or Private? Private
Institution Children's Learning Institute
State/Country Texas
Web Link 1 Survey on treatment for children with autism with and without seizures (External web link)
Web Link 2 No URL available.
Web Link 3 No URL available.
New! History/Related Projects Not available at this time. This functionality is experimental.